tijon

Friday, July 8, 2011

Past Ascribed Gender: Best Masculine Fragrances for Women, Best Feminine Fragrances for Men

How does the ascribed "gender" of fine fragrance impact our decision to try or enjoy something? Conservative mores, which for long viewed fragrance as essentially a feminine accessory, would frown if they could at the thought. But not long past, in the Victorian era men were enthusiastically drenching their lapels and their handkerchiefs with their preferred fragrance, usually floral-derived, to exude a polished, cultivated image. Ancient men and women knew of the power of aromatics and smeared them on their bodies without much regard for whether spikenard or myrrh was considered feminine or masculine.



Nowadays famous and not so famous people regularly bend the rules and cross over to the other side of the counter: My hairdresser's assistant admits she likes to use men's scents because she likes "heavy, spicy stuff"; she's a curvaceous dirty blonde with cherubic features. Angelina Jolie has been wearing Carolina Herrera for men and Bulgari Black for years, both marketed to the XY chromatosome carriers. Kylie Minogue goes for ApoM pour Homme by Maison Francis Kurkdjian. Ruggedly male Sean Connery loves Jicky by Guerlain, which is a gender bender perfume to end all gender benders; changing sex direction mid-stream in its illustrious career like an adolescent fulfiling a transgender urge. Quirky French actor Jean Hughes Angland likes to dab such bombshell fragrances as Boucheron Femme and Chanel No.5; he finds it unusual and more interesting. Cross-dressing can be sexy, not only in fashion but in intimate accessories as well, such as fragrance. When bodies come closer and the lights dim, the mind spins at the possibilities.

Of course most fragrances in the niche industry today, be it from Parfumerie Generale, Serge Lutens, Montale, Nasomatto, L'Artisan Parfumeur etc. do not put a specific label of gender on their products, or at the most, they say that fragrances can be shared between the sexes, even if intended mainly for one out of them. So, for our purposes, I won't include them in this small "top gender bender fragrances" list things which are obviously marketed as shared/unisex, but rather things that would surprise. You can feel free to bend any niche to your own devices and see if it fits; the creators won't raise any eyebrow.

Best Masculine Fragrances for Women

Cartier Déclaration
Déclaration successfully juxtaposes fresh tonalities with cardamom on top with more risqué animal magnetism in an idiosyncratic mix which is arresting.

Chanel Egoiste
The succulent mix of dried fruits and woods in Egoiste is Lutensian before Lutens and thus eminentaly shareable for the ladies. 

Dior Homme
Nothing predisposes one for the dusky, fruity iris hiding at the core of a fragrance tagged "Homme" so blatantly. Today's hommes are more liberal in their cologne choice and so should you be too!

Dior Eau Sauvage
The bracing tang of a good citric cologne with a floral heart of glass-smooth transparency is as good as anything for cheering men or women up. Eau Sauvage is a classic for a reason and has been relentlessly borrowed since its launch in the 1960s. 

Hermès Équipage
For days when nothing but a little butch, yet supremely elegant package fulfills a woman's needs, Équipage is a thoroughbred that gallops steadily.

Guerlain Héritage
The definition of rich woody, cuddly but not maudlin. ritage is classy and pliable enough to wear with homewear when inviting that special someone over.

Guerlain Vétiver
So lovely that it's a shame not partaking of its effortless charms. A citrusy vetiver with a light tobacco background Guerlain's Vétiver is a marvel to be shared.

Goutal Annick Sables
Technically Sables is presented as a masculine and was indeed conceived for a man, but the sweet caramel background, fusing immortelle and smoky vanilla, is great on women too.




Best Feminine Fragrances for Men

Caron Poivre
Dense, peppery-tingling, warm, somewhat dangerous. Don't you want your lover to be so? I thought so. Poivre (vintage extrait) is a marvel for that sort of thing.

Chanel Coco Mademoiselle 
Now that this is code for 20/30 something cute woman out on the prowl at parties despite the "independent" ads, men can have a field day with this hesperidic fruits, rose, jasmine and patchouli harmony. 

Chanel Cuir de Russie
The aristocratic Chanel classic Cuir de Russie, with its iris fond on birch tar leathery accord, always spoke of tweed suits and a leather-upholstered Bentley and those are great things for a man to be seen in. Why not smelled in, as well?

Jacomo Silences
So bitter, starkly green and angular that men will find Silences totally approachable in small doses and not frilly at all.

Grès Cabochard
Really, Cabochard is so close to masculine standard Aramis (both leathery chypres with animalic tonalities, composed by the same perfumer, Bernand Chant) that the leap is self-explanatory. Just get the vintage version in this one.

Piguet Bandit
Bandit is an ash-tray and bitter green quinolines leather chypre. Its creator, Germaine Cellier, was dykey and inspired by models' sweaty underpants. Heterosexual men might find that idea...intriguing for their own reasons.

Tauer Perfumes Une Rose Chyprée
The name predisposes you for a supremely feminine composition. The reality of Une Rose Chyprée is a glorious fragrance for either sex uniting roses with the chypre accord for an intense, retro yet modern feel.

Yves Saint Laurent Opium
Opium by Saint Laurent possesses that classic iron-pressed-linens starchy feel that makes it smell "clean" despite the density of its chords. The spiciness is lifting it into a realm not miles away from masculine offerings.

And of course we can't exclude afore-mentioned Guerlain Jicky, Bulgari Black et al.
What's YOUR favourite gender bender fragrance you can easily pull off?

Pics:
Women as Men shot by Helmut Newton.  
Oliver Theyskens looking like Frida Kahlo, shot by Karl Lagerfeld for the Maison Michel Spring 2011 lookbook

88 comments:

  1. Anonymous15:03

    how about Antaeus by Chanel? or Pour Homme by Caron which is worn by Sting's wife? or 6 L'Amoureux by Dolce Gabbana which is not clearly marked as a masculine fragrance and payid my attention while I was sure it was feminine;-)
    Dom.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous16:01

    I (XY, breeder, and built like a linebacker) wore Chanel No. 5 for months, and no one could figure out what it was. As for Bandit, I assumed it *was* a masculine, if only because of the name (yes, I'm sure there are female bandits, but it has more masculine connotations to me).

    Apres l'Ondee works well for me, in small doses. Indeed, I'm not sure what the M/F difference really amounts to: most feminines work on men, if they work at all. The only real difference, that I can tell, is that men are better off wearing slightly less of whatever it is than women (and you sometimes have to wait a half an hour or so for the more androgynous drydown to emerge).

    ReplyDelete
  3. Roberto16:49

    I own and love Guerlain Sous Le Vent and Philtre d'Amour, they are supposed to be for women but I wear them often.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I enjoy the bitter green iris of Chanel No19 edt.
    Feminité du Bois was of course conceived as an exploration of the classically masculine woody theme but is still very easy to pull off.
    Kingdom can be very feminine on a woman but very neutral on a man.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous17:18

    I love to wear Kenzo Power and Fleur du Male, they are very gentle and cheerful scents.
    -Marla

    ReplyDelete
  6. ...and of course Ormond Jayne Woman is so much better than Ormond Jayne Man... even on a man.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I often wear SJP Covet as a base layered with O de Lancome, or Tuscan Soul, or Absynthe (Avon/Lacroix) depending on my mood.

    Sometimes Tresor or Lagerfeld's Sun Moon Stars, especially when it's hot and humid.

    Obsession Femme is also a Winter staple for me, as is Habanita (often labelled feminine but isn't)

    I also add a dab of LouLou to an application of Grey Flannel for a little extra something.

    Feminite du Bois is also a love. And a little decant of Bandit is now almost disappeared
    Hey a scent is a scent is a scent.

    ReplyDelete
  8. BARBARA O17:47

    Vetiver by Etro.
    Gia Carangi I see in the photo, good choice.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Shalimar is really great on men. Regards

    ReplyDelete
  10. Sofi18:35

    Excellent review! I agree with Roberto for Guerlain sous le vent, I think it is irresistible! I used to wear Joop classic, intense parfum that lasts for long time!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Eva S19:10

    I'm wearing Guerlain Vetivier today, it really is perfect in this heat (nearly 30 degrees).
    Eva S Sweden

    ReplyDelete
  12. raphael19:47

    Without hesitation, I like to wear:

    Dioressence (preferably vintage)
    Diorella (the new version is very masculine, IMO)
    Tabac Blond (pref.vint.)
    Bandit
    Jicky
    Mitsouko (the new EdT is possibly the best on men´s skin)
    Vol de Nuit
    Sous le Vent
    Cuir de Russie, Chanel
    Carnal Flower
    Une Fleur de Cassie
    Y, YSL
    Azurée
    Angélique Encens
    Onda (both, Extrait and EdP)
    Odalisque

    ReplyDelete
  13. Anonymous20:04

    Hi,
    for me is:
    Fracas
    Tubereuse Criminelle
    Vamp a NY
    Beyond Love
    (any tuberose... I'm obsessed :-)
    even vintage Chloe...

    Other than that I enjoy Dune and Kelly Caleche and Eau des Merveilles... but these are much more androgynous...

    Great post!
    ;-)
    Guido

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Saks Fifth Avenue for Her –Jasmine, tuberose, gardenia, vetiver, vanilla

      Delete
  14. Applause to all the men out there who wear and enjoy so-called "feminine" fragrances! (Particularly Guido - I'd *love* to smell tuberose on a guy. Although it's not always a good note for me personally, I think it smells very sexy). Sadly, I don't think we ladies have as good a choice among "masculines." To me they all smell like a variation on cedar-grapefruit-metallic-lavendar. A couple of guys I work with wear scents that seem to be a combination of all four, and they practically singe my nose hairs - I have to hold my breath as I pass them. Very unpleasant - who thought these would be attractive to women? On guys, I'd prefer to smell leather, tobacco, spices, and florals!

    ReplyDelete
  15. To already mentioned, I'll add Dune and Aromatics Elixir.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Wordbird22:41

    The greatest revelatory moments for me in my development as a perfume-fiend have been crossing the gender divide, learning not to perceive patchouli as 'aftershave' and finally getting the delights of oakmoss that lie under that bitter exterior. Nowadays I wear anything that I like.

    Real favourites of mine from the men's department include Bulgari Black, Caron Pour un Homme, Eau d'Hermes, Declaration, Creed Virgin Island Water, Musc Ravageur, Idole de Lubin, Guerlain Heritage... I could go on. I have even been known to wear Yatagan. :)

    And there are SO many of my feminine perfumes that I'd love to try out on a guy - Tabac Blond springs to mind, as does their Coup de Fouet (essentially Poivre in edt) and so many of my beloved incenses. I did spray a male chum with some of my Mitsouko and it smelled very good on him. Though SJP's Lovely was the one he preferred. And I'm now considering Apres L'Ondee when he comes round to help me put up bookcases.

    And yes, I agree with the sentiment that 'if it smells good, wear it! I mean, Andy Tauer's divine L'Air du Desert Marocain is fairly equally adored by both men and women in the online community.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Shalimar Extrait and black tie are a perfect match...

    ReplyDelete
  18. Asali00:27

    Oh of course Idole, as Wordbird says, I didn't even think of it as a masculine, Black Sea is a favourite too and Bois d'encens. And of the Amouages I prefer Reflection Man. Raphael wearing Vol de Nuit, I take my tophat of for that ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  19. Some really good mentions here.

    I love wearing Opium when the weather is cool. Some other feminines I love wearing:

    Black Orchid
    Chinatown (not strictly labelled as a feminine, but the bottle makes it pretty clear who they're targeting)
    Nu
    Black Cashmere
    Bronze Goddess (wore it yesterday, in fact)
    Gucci Eau de Parfum

    Those are the ones I wear with some regularity. I've sampled many, many others and given them the occasional test drive.

    There's a part of me that loves wearing a "women's" perfume. I'm not what I'd consider feminine, though I'm not butch either, but wearing a feminine scent adds a nice little twist, a hint of glamour for contrast.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I find that Chanel's Sycomore can go either way. Frapin's Passion Boisee is in the same vein as Sycomore

    ReplyDelete
  21. Anonymous04:27

    I loved the original men's Armani, Grey Flannel and Xeryus.

    Always loved stealing my boyfriends Bulgari Black and Issey Miyaki Pour Homme.

    Now it's all about Sycomore :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. I've always thought the carnation was a masculine, or at least gender-neutral, smell, so most carnations work really well on me: Coup de Fouet, Terracotta Voile d'Ete, and CdG Carnation are all favourites (not to mention Roger et Gallet carnation soap).

    I also love orientals and chypres, so I wear them without hesitation: Mitsouko, Salvador Dali, Opium, Paloma Picasso, vintage Parfum d'Hermes, and Yvresse, for starters.

    The hell with labels. Life is too short to not smell good.

    ReplyDelete
  23. For me, lately, Dune.

    I guess most Serge Lutens scents are unisex, but one which works great on me, which I would think is more "feminine," is Un Lys.

    ReplyDelete
  24. One I love is Nohiba, a woodsy vetiver that's not generally available in the US -- I got some in a swap. Not sure if it's marketed to men, women or as a unisex I wear Guerlain Vetiver all the time in summer, Rosine's Rose d'Homme (a patchouli rose I'd love to smell on a man but don't ever expect to) ELDO's Je Suis Homme, a leathery/spicy orange blossom...actually, any "men's" fragrances are fine with me as long as they're not loaded with that limey synth-note di-hydromercanol -- oh, and Grey Flannel, too, which I love in hot weather.

    ReplyDelete
  25. My husband smells scrumptious in Angel. He never wears anything at all though.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I have WAY too many to name....I'd say half (if not 2/3) of my fragrances are from the "ladies side of the counter".

    I agree whole-heartedly with what has already been stated: I wear what I enjoy....regardless of whom it is marketed to. (As a side note, I had the opportunity to meet and talk to Frederic Malle when he was doing his "Portrait of a Lady Tour" through the United States of Barney's - and I have to say that I was a tad disappointed that he felt SO strongly that his fragrances were intended for specific genders.....which begs the question: Are we (the consumers/fragrance junkies) "offending" the perfume creators if we insist on wearing something that was specifically created for the opposite gender?

    ReplyDelete
  27. My thirteen year old very feminine daughter loves to wear Jacques Fath, it seems fabulous on her!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Oh heavens! I meant to write "smells"!

    ...smells great on her.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I love to wear vintage Habit Rouge!

    ReplyDelete
  30. The l'Artisan Parfumeur "Fleur de Narcisse" limited edition is a beautiful narcissus; dry, with sunny hay, tobacco and a little leather. Could not be more unisex and sophisticated and the ingredients are of very high quality.

    Also, Hermes Eau de Merveilles, marketed to women, is the sent of salty skin warmed by the sun. The florals and musks behind it are subtle, and it is just as handsome as it is beautiful.

    And I LOVE Bandit on men.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I love your lead picture. It's so beautiful, the postures, and so appropriate. I spent a full minute wondering, "Is that a man or a woman?"

    ReplyDelete
  32. edwardian09:10

    Bal a Versailles in all forms and concentrations; Acqua di Parma Profumo and most chypres; Carthusia Ligea la sirena; Annick Goutal Eau de Camille and Folavril; Halston; Floris Edwardian Bouquet; Hermes Hiris; Narcisse Noir and many by Guerlain: Sous le Vent, Vol de Nuit, Chamade and Nahema.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I love wearing to beautiful gourmand scent from Guerlain, Mitsouko and Terracotta Voile d'Ete. They seem to appear sheer and gourmand on me but not feminine actually.

    I guess that's because Guerlain works fine on my skin generally. lol

    ReplyDelete
  34. I like wearing my husband's Eau Savage (his favourite scent). My two boys (6 and 8 years) like to use their mother's Mandragore (Goutal)

    ReplyDelete
  35. @ MJ

    So wonderful to hear you let your little ones use an "adult" scent! Once I posted on another site about letting my daughter (similar age at the time) keep a frag that didn't work on me and I got CHEWED out by a reader for being a freakishly permissive mother!

    I'm glad to see great minds think alike somewhere in the world! ;~)

    ReplyDelete
  36. @ The Frowzy Chickadee

    In Spain, is "normal" to perfume children from an early age. Usually are non-alcohol scents, and normally we put some in the clothes or the hair. Nenuco is a very popular scent for children.

    I remember when I was nine years old that one of my aunts gave me a semi-full bottle of Diorella (she didn't like it). I used it on my and on my dolls, as hair spray!!!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Bite the marketing.

    I've worn Le Male since I was 17-ish and I still love it. Funnily enough, my mother, who is the type of Do as Joneses do, nearly fainted when she learned that it's a masculine fragrance and stopped liking it on me instantly.

    Then, has anyone already mentioned Terre d'Hermes? My long-time favourite. Habit Rouge is nice, too. And I must not forget Shiseido's Basala.

    ReplyDelete
  38. @ MJ

    Originally, I am from France, so I understand what you mean about sharing a fragrance with a child--it's not a big deal. Unfortunately many Americans have very puritanical notions about fragrances and who should and should not wear them. This is too bad in my opinion, as a good solid perfume education cannot start early enough!

    Your dolls must have smelled heavenly!

    ReplyDelete
  39. dleep17:26

    Wearing Gendarme today and have gotten two compliments.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Dom,

    Antaeus is an excellent suggestion! Thanks! Pour Homme is such a classic it defied suggestion on my list, but you're certainly right about it. Not crazy about the D&G collection though :/

    ReplyDelete
  41. Anon,

    I bet you got very interesting conversations! There's a man! To be perfectly honest with you, there IS a male Bandit version I believe. There's also a Fracas pour homme, from what I recall. Don't ask me more, they do crop up in searches.
    The original Bandit is great on a man, as you succinctly say, it reads as "masculine". Androgynous, if you must. :-)
    Lovely choice sporting ALO! That's such a cuddly, soft scent, it needs a little roughness to show its mettle.
    The M/F frag divide is largely a projection of societal mores, if you ask me.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Roberto,

    what lovely choices! These are seriously delicious perfumes, I love them myself and would love to smell them on more men out there.

    ReplyDelete
  43. C,

    great additions, thank you!
    I admit I hadn't thought of FdB as an exploration of men's scents, but the idea is intriguing.
    Love Kingdom and don't get the "ho" thing it's infamously quipped for.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Marla,

    excellent thank you! I do love Fleur de Male on women, but haven't really tested POwer. Now need to!

    ReplyDelete
  45. C,

    of course!! OJ Woman is so delicious it defies gender. It's a magical creature from outer space sprinkling things with violet-tinged speckles. Love it to bits!

    ReplyDelete
  46. JadeG,

    lovely ideas there and so creative! You give me a lot of material to play with. Thanks and thanks for commenting!

    ReplyDelete
  47. Barbara,

    naturally, about the Etro: vetiver can be very alluring on both sexes, I find in general. Good choice on your part!
    Glad you liked the photo. The "smoking" suit pic is so cliche, but this one is even better! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  48. Vizcon de (or Vicont?),

    *smacking forhead* Of course!! My omission: Shalimar. Figures! Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Sofi,

    thank you, appreciate the kind words. Roberto is very discerning :-)
    And so are you!

    ReplyDelete
  50. E,

    yup, it's one of those great summer scents. The Vetiver pour Elle is even better and could be worn by a man. LOL!

    30C in Sweden?? Jesus!!!

    ReplyDelete
  51. Raphael,

    lovely, lovely and beyond lovely additions. I especially love your suggestion of Odalisque which would immediately bring to mind women due to the name, but it should be so exquisite on a man. Tabac Blond is another great!

    ReplyDelete
  52. Guido,

    thanks for saying you liked the post, much appreciated. :-)

    Good suggestions, even though daring! You must be the brave kind of guy.

    Love your Hermes choices: pure elegance, effortless.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Patty,

    tuberose on men can be butcher and less "candy-ish", I find they project more of the rubber part which is odd but fascinating.
    Hate those hair-raising sharp things on men as well! Why do all guys try to emulate THAT??

    ReplyDelete
  54. Michal,

    love your choices: AE is especially great on a guy.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Wordbird,

    if the men commenting here are any indication, your experiment should get you far!! :D
    I love that he chose Lovely: in that pink bottle! (but never mind, the juice is lovely indeed and not frilly at all). Do try the ALO on him!
    And kudos on your personal journey!

    ReplyDelete
  56. Duke,

    excellent, exquisite suggestion as always. Such a suggestive classic! Thanks for commenting :-)

    ReplyDelete
  57. Asali,

    indeed, especially in the niche department, the gender divide is completely blurred. I don't even think they market them as "masculine" or "feminine", knowing connoisseurs pick what they like regardless. Amouage sticks with it, but I think they also fully well know the above fact ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  58. Spike,

    someone wearing Opium! YEAH! Nu is also another favourite of mine on men, need to add it. Gucci edp brown is so rich that I guess it draws perfumistas naturally, be them men or women.

    How unusual that you chose Bronze Goddess! I find that of all feminine frags, the one "note" that men are reluctant to wear is coconut. (O could be totally wrong, what do you think? Maybe I need to get out more?)

    ReplyDelete
  59. Eld,

    yeah, Sycomore was conceived to go either way. And boy, does it do.
    Now, I need to track that Frapin!! *tearing my hair out a little bit because you instigated a sample lemming*

    ReplyDelete
  60. Anon,

    with a past like that, your present is great and the future looks even more promising. I look forward to what you come up next!

    ReplyDelete
  61. C,

    carnations...so underrated. The spicy bits are great on a man. And it helps that carnations got paired with woody/leathery notes in the past. Great choices for the rest, as usual.
    Gotta love your ending line!

    ReplyDelete
  62. Furriner,

    I find Dune really a chameleon: it works great in summer, in winter, in between, on men, on women, when happy, when sad, when contemplative, when out...It's so versatile. Magnificent!
    The reason I didn't include any Lutens was exactly because they're not gender specific on purpose, but Un Lys sounds like the more feminine of the lot. Interesting that you find it appealing!

    ReplyDelete
  63. P,

    not sure on the marketing of Nohiba. I never encountered the bottle either. I love Rose d'Homme though, such an earthy rose, and share your shudder at dihydromyrcenol. The horror!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Luxebytes,

    thanks for chimming in! Hope to see you on these pages.
    Angel...there's a daring man! I just see the quizzical stares, wondering what it is they're smelling.

    ReplyDelete
  65. Marko,

    honestly, I think the irritation is superficial as long as the line gets a good following. After someone buys a frag, there are so many opportunities for it to change hands, one can't possibly control who their intended audience is! Portrait of a Lady sounds feminine, but it reads as androgynous to me. The rest, why are they gender specific? They do read that way to me, even in the ad copy provided. I guess FM didn't want to alienate his male customers whom he met "one to one"?

    ReplyDelete
  66. TFC,

    how inspiring!! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Nina,

    there's a lot to be said about vintage Habit Rouge. Obviously one is that it suits any gender with taste.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Scott,

    how could I possibly disagree with your choices? I love and wear all three and believe they're all supremely fine on male skin too (and yes, I tried them on SO to prove it)

    ReplyDelete
  69. Dain,

    thanks honey! Isn't it one of the best Newton pics? I love the posturing, the ambivalence and the gender play. It's Gia there.

    ReplyDelete
  70. Edwardian,

    worthwhile addition, thank you for including them. I need to wear some of them myself more.

    ReplyDelete
  71. Craig,

    Guerlain does know a trick or two on how to make very sinful, appealing scents. Terracota Voile d'Ete has carnation notes, so as pyramus says maybe you should try more carnation scents still? There's an idea...

    ReplyDelete
  72. MJ,

    clearly a family to be watchful of! The beginnings of a serious path to financial ruin! :P

    ReplyDelete
  73. MJ,

    clearly a family to be watchful of! The beginnings of a serious path to financial ruin! :P

    ReplyDelete
  74. TFC,

    I am a little surprised that people have the audacity to judge others so harshly online. Who thought that putting a thought out there is invitation for lecturing?

    ReplyDelete
  75. And oh, I fully agree with MJ. The same happens in many countries in Europe, I remember getting frags as gifts and hand-me-downs all the time. I believe it's because the notion of "sexing up the kid" via frag use (which I have read about online from a few US posters in other venues) is non existent. Perfume is not seen as seduction primarily, but as well-being. Makes for more "permissive" use.

    ReplyDelete
  76. L,

    LOL, marketing brain-washed your mother, I guess on that one.

    I was almost certain you'd mention Basala. It's very unusual nowadays, which makes it a perfect conversation piece.

    ReplyDelete
  77. TFC,

    how interesting! Disregard the above, then. You already know there is some difference in opinion on use of frag on children. (Duh)

    ReplyDelete
  78. Dleep,

    Gendarme is the kind of thing I always note down to get more samples of and always forget. This is a good incentive to finally bite the bullet!

    ReplyDelete
  79. Diane23:14

    I (24 year old feminine french student in Paris)am currently wearing leather oud by Dior (smells great in the hair) and my boyfriend loves Bandit !
    Thank you for your blog !

    ReplyDelete
  80. Diane23:15

    I (24 year old feminine french student in Paris)am currently wearing leather oud by Dior (smells great in the hair) and my boyfriend loves Bandit !
    Thank you for your blog !

    ReplyDelete
  81. Diane,

    welcome to Perfume Shrine and thanks for commenting! I hope you like it here and contribute to the discussion.

    I think Leather Oud is among the better renditions of this genre and certainly a very good entry in the Dior line recently. I haven't tried in the hair, but it's a very alluring idea, thank you! Bandit is great on a man, gives that voyou element, the dark stranger thing. ;-)
    *whistles wolfishly (comme un loup)*

    ReplyDelete
  82. Anonymous23:28

    I wear L'instant pour homme, Heritage, And Vetiver. I also love acqua di Parma colonia Intensa and Monsieur Balmain. I love them all. I just discovered Heritage and it's breathtaking.

    ReplyDelete
  83. Im a 29 year old man who wears feminine frangrances but none of the listed above.
    I started with Robert Piguets Visa which stays a favourite,then the incredibly masculine Balmain Ambre gris that wouldnt last ling enough on my skin, I like Hermes Hiris but I intend on buying Chanel Les exclusifs Jersey as it seems to last longer and smells like nothing else. Curious to try YSL Opium now.

    ReplyDelete
  84. Anon ( I presume you\'re a woman),

    I LOVE and wear L'Instant pour Homme, Heritage (need to get a new bottle sometime, my old one is empty) and Vetiver (I assume Guerlain, right?) These are incredible perfumes. And who can argue with the great colognes by AdP? I hear so many good words on actually borrowing Monsieur Balmain that I need to give it a try! Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  85. Eden,

    thank you so much for sharing your list of favorites with our readers here. These are lovely choices!
    I probably need to reacquaint myself with the Jersey (don't recall it well), but do trust me and give a try to Opium, preferably vintage EDT: clean spice engulfing you for hours on end. Delicious on a man, as I've found out!

    ReplyDelete
  86. ellina08:05

    Hello! I find Egoiste totally unisex, and the same goes for dior homme. My favourite is Prada infusion d' homme' which I enjoy in our scorching hot greek summer. From the women's counter,I think ?Chsnel Coco is definitely suited for men, too, as well as chanel no. 19, and ?bottega veneta bottega veneta edp for women.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellina, your choices are definitely wise. No.19 is great on men, in fact I have tested this many times during private consultations. Need to try with Bottega Veneta edp too, because I'm sure it'd be a hit. (it's so Lutensian, isn't it?)
      Thanks for commenting!

      Delete

Type your comment in the box, choose the Profile option you prefer from the drop down menu below the text box (Anonymous is fine if you don't want the other options) and hit Publish! And you're set!

Blog Widget by LinkWithin