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Thursday, September 26, 2013

Ormonde Jayne Montabaco: fragrance review

Possibly the most "masculine" leaning of the otherwise aimed at both sexes new collection The Four Corners of the Earth, it being a fougere, Montabaco by Ormonde Jayne is a perfume to capture the essence of Latin America: leather, suede, wood and tobacco leaf repeated over and over again creating a suggestive sensuality and Latino temperament. Basically what the typical westerner dreams of smelling at Havana or any such exotic port of call. Does it deliver a poker hand worthy of a gambler the repute of Jack Weil? I say it does, though in a cleaned up fashion, just like Redford is a cleaned up version of a seedy gambler in the first place.

via pinterest

The floral presence of magnolia, jasmine and rose are meant to soften the toughness of those unashamedly seductive, classic masculine codes for "macho." You can almost see the beautiful face of a Latin analogue of Tyrone Power behind the smoky rings of the tobacco. In our day and age, this is the only acceptable way to get your tobacco fix (mon tabac, get it?), but what a great way it is, eh?
The aromatics in Montabaco are fusing into the woody-fern ambience, giving it an odd freshness. Last but not least, thanks to the unerring fondness of perfumer Geza Schoen for Iso E Super, a woody-hazy-musky component in the base of many of his compositions, Montabaco (an Iso-E Super beast if there's one) radiates friendly vibes in a radius of building blocks and lasts extremely well, even it is noticed more by those coming into contact with you than yourself on you at all times.

Notes for Ormonde Jayne Montabaco:
top : air note, orange absolute, bergamot, juniper, clary sage,cardamom.
heart : magnolia, hedione, rose, violet, tea notes.
base : tobacco leaf, iso e, suede, sandalwood, moss, tonka, ambergris.

Available exclusively at the Ormonde Jayne London boutiques.

7 comments:

  1. Miss Heliotrope01:44

    Sounds worth having a play - but I do find the whole masculine/feminine thing amusing: it's a scent, but not too blokey...or male scent's that aren't too girly... I find it more of a pretend than most sex/identity things are.

    & no, I don't mean gender - such a badly & over used word

    ReplyDelete
  2. Miss Heliotrope01:45

    & I hate getting apostrophes wrong - scents, not scent's.

    Pedantry starts at home...

    ReplyDelete
  3. MH,

    it is most certainly an amusing and manufactured divide, but there you have it: lots of people reading are waiting for clues on whether something would be "too masculine" for them (re:niche offerings not specifically gender-aimed) or whether they can gift a man with something that is not "so macho" as usual.
    Therefore I have to pronounce an opinion on that as well, though I do it with a somewhat heavy heart....

    "Wear what you like" should be everyone's mantra, if you ask me!

    ReplyDelete
  4. MH,

    LOL, yeah, don't worry.
    Like I said in the past we're not composing the Encyclopedia Brittanica at this moment; I do strive for factual checking and as solid a text as possible, but it's realistically impossible to note every comma and every typo in this format, both from myself and from my readers (who are the cream anyway); someday, when compiling a book, perhaps. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Miss Heliotrope09:18

    I know re typos, but they annoy me.

    Intensely.

    (In Terry Pratchett's Going Postal the head of the green grocer's guild (as in the grocer's apostrophe) TALKS' LIKE THI'S ONLY BETTER & ITS'S FUNNIER THAN ALMO'ST ANYTHING)

    ReplyDelete
  6. The apostrophes and the it's instead of its, or there's instead of theirs, greatly annoy me as well. Usually (though I could be mistaken) however this comes from native speaker for some reason. (Same as in French native speakers confuse the gerund with the participle, for some reason; I think these basic grammatical rules are taught on from the base up on foreign speakers who are free to fumble with other things, such as proper conjugation and formation of idiomatic syntactical patterns which come naturally to the native speaker)

    (LOL on the TP satire!)

    ReplyDelete
  7. The apostrophes and the it's instead of its, or there's instead of theirs, greatly annoy me as well. Usually (though I could be mistaken) however this comes from native speaker for some reason. (Same as in French native speakers confuse the gerund with the participle, for some reason; I think these basic grammatical rules are taught on from the base up on foreign speakers who are free to fumble with other things, such as proper conjugation and formation of idiomatic syntactical patterns which come naturally to the native speaker)

    (LOL on the TP satire!)

    ReplyDelete

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