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Sunday, January 16, 2011

Annick Goutal Mimosa: new fragrance

Annick Goutal’s ‘Le Mimosa’ is the newest entry in the world of the esteemed brand's soliflores line, which included Le Jasmin, La Violette, Des Lys, La Muguet, Neroli, Rose Absolue and Le Chèvrefeuille (Soliflores are fragrances based around the scent of a single flower; technically mixed with other essences, but aiming to highlight the blossom's character).

Mimosa stands as the first mocking of spring into the face of winter, as the branches start to yellow as early as February. In Grasse and the Riviera, the Mimosa Trail is a supremely memorable drive, scattered with local festivals and picturesque events.
The many perfumery's takes on mimosa include such classics as the warmly honeyed Mimosaique by Patricia de Nicolai, the milky-kittenish Mimosa pour Moi by L'Artisan Parfumeur, the intensely euphoric Farnesiana by Caron, as well as the reissued Hermès Calèche Fleurs de Méditerranée with its unusual violet leaf or the extreme of the laundred clean musks of Czech & Speake's Mimosa.
The yellow pom-pom blossom isn't a stranger in the Annick Goutal line, as Eau de Charlotte puts it to good effect against a constrast of cocoa and blackcurrant jam.
Goutal's new Le Mimosa nevertheless will include greener, sweet notes of mimosa flanked by the soft fruity satin of peach, the milky warmth of sandalwood and the powdered notes of iris.
Le Mimosa comes in the house’s emblematic fluted “gadroon” bottle, this time adorned with a bow of black polka dots on a yellow ribbon.
The fragrance will make its debut in the market in March 2011.

Related reading on Perfume Shrine: Travel Memoirs Grasse-hopers part 1 and part 2

pic via osmoz

7 comments:

  1. This definitely sounds giddiness-inducing. I could probably dive into a tub of this and not once want to come up for air. I'm only now seriously playing with florals, and I'm having the easiest time (obviously) starting out with the more delicate and soft ones like mimosa, osmanthus, tiare, frangipani- these are all scents I am comfortable with. When we start getting into the roses, jasmines, tuberoses, etc- I start to cringe. I hope to sensitize myself to them soon so I can continue my exploration of scents into uncharted (or previously shunned) territory. :)

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  2. Oooooo, I tell you Helg - I am waiting for this to come to my shores for I adore mimosa - or should I really say - wattle as we call if for its a Australian flower that was introduced to Europe.

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  3. kathleen13:56

    Mimosa scents. I love them. Will be awaiting this one, with breath that is bated.

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  4. Carrie,

    it does sound like something happy and cheerful.
    You seem like on a wonderful, adventurous path (frangipani I would wager is pretty potent stuff anyway, I mean the blossom, so you're doing swell!)
    It's not necessary of course that one likes every family on the chart, although it's always worthwhile that one explores the "regions" one isn't comfortable with, before pronouncing them "not for me"; so I wish you much success upon your path!

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  5. M,

    I'm pretty confident it will reach you: Goutal has a sound business backing up, so chances are good.
    Yeah, isn't it completely fascinating that the emblem of the Riviera is a native of Oz? It always seemed very fun!

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  6. Kathleen,

    if the take on gardenia in Matin d'Orage is anything to go by we might expect something different for this mimosa than what usually circulates. Green and peachy...mmm!

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  7. I like Mimosa Pour Moi very much- I will be interested in trying this

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