Monday, March 22, 2021

Diptyque Fleur de Peau: fragrance review

The Diptyque story began in 1961 Paris at 34 Boulevard Saint-Germain with, at its heart, three friends driven by the same creative passion, who chose a Greek word which means a dual panel painting. Illustration was the very core of the founders, as Christiane Gautrot was an interior designer, Desmond Knox-Leet, a painter, and Yves Coueslant, a theater director and set designer. From then on, inspired by their Hellenic treks along the Greek peninsula and its mountainous terrain, and from their country cottage on the picturesque Mount Pelion, buried amidst thick fig trees all the way down the sea front, they launched several classics, from Virgilio to Philosykos

via

But the brand also presents a later day constellation of contemporary stars, like Eau Duelle and 34 Boulevard St.Germain. Picking just one is an Herculean task. The most sensual in the current rotation however is an easy choice. None other than Fleur de Peau. 

 Fleur de Peau relies on that rarity of the "musky idea": it harnesses the vegetal musks from angelica archangelica and ambrette seed oil, flanking them with ambrettolide, a macrocyclic musk which shares properties with ambrette seed and aids diffusion and lasting power. Thus the somewhat nutty, with a hint of berry, slightly sweaty and oddly metallic fusion of the properties in those fine musks gains the upper hand and makes Fleur de Peau very sensuous. 

Backed up with classic starchy iris, and carrot seed, which aids the earthy, starchy effect, it creates a cocoon of scent on the skin; it's as if the Platonic idea of sensuality has landed on our shores. The delicacy of vegetal musk with the central chord of pink pepper and rose recalls the refinement of Les Exclusifs de Chanel No 18 Chanel, and Musc Nomade Annick Goutal, two other fragrances with ambrette seed oil tucked into their heart of hearts. A quiet sensuality that does not plunge its décolleté low.

 

via pinterest amodelmoment

Fleur de Peau is soft, tenacious, with a discreet but perceptible sillage, radiant and glorious indeed. One of the better launches by Diptyque in recent years.

8 comments:

  1. I love Fleur de Eau. It is so cosy and beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If we both mean the same, yes, it is! Thanks for dropping by Filomena!

      Delete
  2. sounds appealing enough. is the rose notable throughout wear, i wonder, or only in earlier stages?

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    Replies
    1. Not really. It's the same affair as rose in Chanel No.18. If one's not told there's a big rose, you can't tell really.
      I like it very much although I find most roses either maudlin or sour. (There are exceptions of course!)

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  3. Emma18:19

    I'm smelling Starke / Paris / Peau de Soie / Dominique Ropion from this review!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're not very far away. Good point.
      I think FdP has a slight ambrette undertone which dominates and is very sensuous. PdS is cleaner, starker (ha!)

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  4. I've been wanting to try this one. I've ordered some samples and look forward to trying them. I'm also sampling Volutes. Many folks like it, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, these are good.
      Volutes is easy to like for the ambers/vanilla and smoke crowd, it's more or less how a classic niche would perform.
      Thanks for commenting!

      Delete

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