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Sunday, February 17, 2013

Etro Rajasthan, Floris Cherry Blossom, Tom Ford Sahara Noir: new fragrances


The newest Etro fragrance in a gloriously paisley-motif presentation that recalls its previous splendor and the regal decoration of Indian textiles, is called Rajasthan and vividly depicts the sumptuousness of a Maharaja's palace.

The fragrance notes of Etro's Rajasthan include lemon combined with rich Damascus rose and yellow mimosa on the top. The heart is reprising the mimosa via acacia farnesiana softened with the rosiness of pink pepper, while the base includes amber, labdanum and white musk.

Available from March 2013 in 100 ml Eau de Parfum.



Floris on the other hand is inspired by Japan and its tradition of sakura and hanami, the blossoming of the cherry tree and the celebrations surrounding it for their latest, Cherry Blossom fragrance.
The fresh, luminous blend of bergamot, orange and pink pepper gives way to the floral bouquet of cherry blossom, osmanthus, rose and peony with a fruity note of cherry. Warm sandalwood and musk finish off the composition.

Cherry Blossom by Floris is available as 100ml eau de parfum.



Tom Ford is augmenting his line of department store available fragrances with Sahara Noir, his newest perfume for women inspired by the Middle East.
This woody oriental is encased in a gold bottle that reprises the design of Black Orchid, Violet Blonde and White Patchouli, this time in gold.

Sahara Noir opens with bitter orange, sweet oasis grasses and Levantine cypress. The heart is composed of frankincense that is offset with cinnamon, Egyptian jamine and Moroccan rose. Sahara Noir finishes with cedar and vanilla tones.The name is inspired by the makeup shades by Tom Ford under the tag Sahara Haze.


via relaxnews.com
According to the Moodie Report: "The oriental woody juice is crafted around a heart of frankincense. This key ingredient is complemented by top notes of cistus essence Orpur® (Orpur denotes a natural ingredient of exceptional quality and purity), bitter orange, Jordanian calamus – an oasis sweet grass – and Levantine cypress, famed for growing in the gardens of the 1001 Arabian Nights.The heart blends frankincense essence Orpur® , cinnamon, cool papyrus extract, Egyptian jasmine templar and rose absolute from Morocco. A beeswax extraction from Burma lends body and a supple, honeyed-animalic richness. The warm dry down is laced with amber. It is formed by a special blend of labdanum – labdanum absolute and a rich natural fraction of labdanum known as ambreinol – combined with benzoin, vanilla, cedar, frankincense resin, agarwood (oud) and balsam."

Launch date is set for March 2013 for the Middle East and May for the rest of the world.

Tom Ford is also launching a new Private Blend soon, more details on which will be revealed as soon as they let me into it.


6 comments:

  1. Prince Barry09:11

    The Etro sounds quite interesting apart from the 'white musk'

    Floris should stick to English inspired creations and Cherry Blossom doesn't seem to fit In with their image. I can't think of an exciting cherry blossom scent.

    As for Mr Ford, lets add 'Noir' on the end like we have done before, even if Noir has been done to death by various companies. I don't think I have smelled a 'Noir' fragrance that is actually 'Noir'.

    ReplyDelete
  2. B,

    resounding agreement on almost everything!

    Fortunately I don't have a personal aversion to white musk en masse (after all, "white musk" can be a lot of things these days, it's just a blanket term for synthetic musk with a floral component), so I can remain hopeful for the Etro. The packaging alone is to die for (don't you miss the old style?)

    As to Floris, I really don't know how they should rebrand themselves if they're to live beyond Victoriana and establishing themselves as a firm niche player (sometimes I see the same problem with Penhaligon's).

    As to the Ford (he does issue decent-smelling things though, doesn't he), "noir" HAS been done to death, and indeed almost nothing smells noirish. However since you mention it, I would recommend (if you're not averse to patchouli) to try Ayala Moriel's "Film Noir" and Tauer's "Dark Passage" (not "noir" in the name, but close); they REALLY dark and dangerous. Very lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Miss Heliotrope00:03

    I think the pattern on the first is fabulous - I'd like a scarf or shawl or maybe a really sharply cut jacket.

    The Japanese use of cherry blossom is fascinating - but mostly in food, which is tricky to get outside of their country (unless anyone knows some good websites?). As a scent, I think I would prefer it used with a bit more imagination than fresh/floral.

    & I've never seen a black desert - even at night they're more silver & blue. It sounds interesting, but too juicy for how I think of such landscapes.

    But - isn't it good if brands are trying to develop what they produce? Expanding horizons, being different & so on? We are usually complaining that everyone is the same. I presume it would help if they did the different well, but if they're at least considering it...

    ReplyDelete
  4. As a lifelong fragrophile, I am delighted to have found your blog (via Fragrantica.com, which I also just discovered this week!). Your posts are engaging, informative and delightfully witty, and it is a delight to read more on scent, which is such a defining element of my own daily experience. I look forward to reading your archives.


    I have linked you on my own humble little blog, and will do a fragrance post soon. All best to you, and thank you for your writing!

    ReplyDelete
  5. C,

    I think the motif on the Etro is to die for. I'd love a throw for the sofa in that, you know? So decadent.

    Hmm, expanding is good, but somehow I think that the niche and mainstream firms expanding sometimes take on themes that will be popular to their intended markets: at this point the Middle East and the Far East as the rest of the Western markets are considered more or less "deja vu" and a tad declining. (the US due to overpopulation of brands, Europe due to the crisis etc).
    So this is how I interpret the Floris and the Tom Ford.

    Good point on the blue and silvery night desert! The stars alone become so bright.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Phlegmfatale (good handle, by the way!),

    thank you for stopping by after "discovering" me and for the linkage, I'm honoured. I hope you find many things to discover here too.
    And by all means, I would be most happy to read your fragrant post when you're up and running.

    Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete

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